Assessment 2016

Click here to download the Assessment 2016 Handbook

Over the last few years there have been huge changes to the educational landscape, many of these changes are still working their way through the system and their impact is yet to be felt.  Here is a summary of the changes by Key Stage.

Key Stage 2

Removal on National Curriculum levels.  Each school to develop their own way of recording and reporting progress.  KS2 SAT results given as a standardised score and a judgement made as to whether students have met the required standard.

Key Stage 3

Removal on National Curriculum levels.  Each school to develop their own way of recording and reporting progress.  New curriculum in place for all subjects, schools advised to concentrate on ‘depth of knowledge’ rather than ‘breadth’.

Key Stage 4

2015 saw the first teaching of new reformed GCSEs in English and Mathematics.  These new GCSEs (first examined in 2017) will be graded on 1 – 9 scale.  The following year all other subjects (apart from DT and Business studies) began their new specifications.   The amount of Controlled Assessment has been reduced for most subjects.

Key Stage 5

First teaching of new reformed A Levels began in 2015.  Previously AS was the first year of the A Level, and the AS grade counted towards a student’s overall A level grade.  In reformed A levels, the AS course has now been decoupled from the A Level.  This means that students can still sit an AS exam but the grade does not count towards the A level grade.  The A level exam will test students on the whole two years of study.  As of Sept 2016 reformed A Levels have started in all subjects except for Maths, Film Studies, Government and Politics, ICT, Classical Civilisation and Media.

Assessment at CCGS

With the removal of National Curriculum levels and the introduction of a new grading system at KS4 we have decided to implement a new whole school assessment method.  This will allow a single system of assessment to be used from when students start in year 7 until their complete their GCSE exams in Year 11.

The aim of this system is to provide a clearer pathway of progression from the start of year 7 to the GCSE exams in Year 11.  It will hopefully remove confusion when equating NC levels with GCSE grades and will provide a better basis for Year 9 in selecting their GCSE options. 

The system was developed after examination of other school systems and attendance at national meetings on assessment.  All Heads of Department were fully involved in the decision making process and staff have spent this academic year adapting resources to fit in with the new assessment policy.

 

Assessment at CCGS will be based on a 1 – 9 grading system (with 9 being the highest grade).  A system of subgrades (e.g. 2-, 3+) will be used to show progress through the grade.

Extra grades below grade 1 have been added, these are known as Foundation Grades (F1, F2 and F3) and these are used to grade students who have not reached grade 1 of the GCSE scale yet.

Here is a rough guide to how the new GCSE Grades equate to the old NC Levels

New GCSE Grades

Old National Curriculum Grades

F3- to F1+

1C – 3A

1

4

2

5

3

6

4

7

5

8

 

How do I know if my Son/Daughter is making progress?

In the first few weeks at CCGS students sit a baseline test in each of their subjects.  This baseline (on the 1 – 9 scale) is then used as the starting point from where we measure progress.  Class tests, exercises, projects and homework will be marked using the 1 -9 scale, students and parents will be able to see if progress is being made from their starting point.

Reporting to Parents

KS3

Students are issued with a report each half term. Three times a year (Christmas, Easter and the Summer) this report contains ‘Academic Tracking information’.  This takes the form of a ‘Working at’ grade for each subject and a judgement from the class teacher as to whether progress is ‘Above Expected’, ‘Expected’ or ‘Below Expected’.

At KS3, subjects have different definitions of what ‘Expected Progress’ is.  This is based on how much they have studied a subject for at KS2 – e.g. English and Maths expects less progress as baseline test results will be higher, however French and Spanish will expect much greater progress as baseline tests as likely to be lower.  The table below shows what ‘Expected Progress’ is for each subject

 

Expected Baseline score

Expected Progress

Good Progress

English

2- to 3-

2

3

Maths

2- to 3-

2

3

Science

1+ to 2+

2

3

Geog

1- to 2-

3

4

History

1- to 2-

3

4

RS

1- to 2-

3

4

MFL (French)

F2- to F1+

Y7 - 6

Y8 - 5

Y9 - 4

Y7 - 7

Y8 - 6

Y9 - 5

MFL (Spanish)

F2- to F1+

Y8 - 8

Y9 - 6

Y8 - 9

Y9 - 7

CS

1+ to 3-

2

3

PE

2- to 3-

2

3

DT

1- to 2+

2

3

Music

F1 to 2+

2

3

Art

1- to 1+

2

3

 

 

Target Grades
We have decided to remove the use of ‘Target Grades’ from KS3 and instead focus on a student’s progress from their baseline. We feel that this is a more ‘positive’ way of tracking their academic performance for students that are still quite a way off from their GCSE Exams

 

KS4

At the start of year 10 we set Target Grades for students across all their GCSE subjects.  Target Grades are based on their KS2 Data and adjusted in light of the progress made at the school so far.  The same pattern of reporting is followed as KS3.  The academic information given is ‘Working at Grade’ and a ‘Projected Grade’.  A ‘Projected Grade’ is the grade that your son/daughter’s teacher thinks they will attain at the end of the course if they carry on working as they are.

In Year 11, students receive academic tracking information in each report they receive

At both KS3 and KS4 students’ progress is closely monitored by subject staff and by the pastoral team (Heads of House and the Senior tutors).

 

 

 

New GCSE Grades v Old Grades

Information from the government states that a new ‘Grade 4’ will be equivalent to a ‘Low grade C’.  However the DFE have already stated that for school measures (such as % English and Maths) it is a Grade 5 that will be the minimum.  We are telling our students that a Grade 5 will be seen as a ‘pass’ in the future.