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KS5 Computer Science

Computer Science is one of the most fascinating and most relevant subjects in the world today.

On this course you will learn how to adapt to new technology and understand how software can be developed. You will also be given an opportunity to develop your own application.

Students with experience in computer science are in high demand by employers and you do not need to have taken the GCSE to enrol on this A Level course.

Year 12

Component    
01 Computing
principles
Mix of question types: including short-answer,
longer-answer, and levels of response
mark-scheme-type questions.
Characteristics of contemporary
systems architecture:

Operating systems

Software and software development:
Introduction to programming

Exchanging data:
Databases, networks and web technologies

Data types, representation and structures:
Using Boolean algebra

Legal, moral, ethical and cultural issues
Computing-related laws
02 Algorithms
and problem
solving

 
Traditional questions concerning
computational thinking.

Mix of question types: including short-answer,
longer-answer, and levels of response mark-
scheme-type questions.

There will be a short scenario/task contained
in the paper, which could be an algorithm but
will involve problem solving.
Elements of computational thinking:
Understanding computational thinking

Problem solving and programming:
Programming techniques
Software development methodologies

Algorithms:
Analysis and design

 

Component Assessment Weighting Marks and duration
01 Computing
principles
Externally marked question paper 50% 70 marks / 1 hr 15 mins
02 Algorithms and
problem solving

 
Externally marked question paper 50% 70 marks / 1 hr 15 mins

 

Year 13

Component    
01 Computer
systems
Mix of question types: including short-answer,
longer-answer, and banded mark-scheme-type
questions.

The characteristics of contemporary processors,
input, output and storage devices

Components of a computer and their uses

Software and software development:
Types of software and the methodologies used
to develop them

Exchanging data:
How data is exchanged between
different systems

Data types, data structures and algorithms
How data is represented and stored in different
structures and the use of different algorithms

Legal, moral, cultural and ethical issues
Laws surrounding the use and ethical issues
that can arise from the use of computers

02 Algorithms
and Programming

 

Two sections:

A – Traditional questions concerning computational thinking.

Mix of question types: including short-answer, longer-answer, and levels of response mark-scheme-type questions.

B –Scenario/task contained in the paper, which could be an algorithm but will involve problem solving.

Short-answer, longer-answer questions, and levels of response mark-scheme-type questions.

Sections A and B

Elements of computational thinking
What is meant by computational thinking

Problem solving and programming
How computers are used to solve problems
and programs can be written to solve them

Algorithms
The use of algorithms to describe problems and
standard algorithms

03 Programming
project
Candidates and/or centres select their own user-driven problem of an appropriate size and complexity to solve.
This will enable them to demonstrate the skills and knowledge necessary to meet the Assessment Objectives.

Analysis of the problem
Design of the solution
Implementation of the solution
Evaluation

 

Component Assessment Weighting Marks and duration
01 Computing
principles
Externally marked question paper 40% 140 marks / 2 hr 30 mins
02 Algorithms and
problem solving

 
Externally marked question paper 40% 140 marks / 2 hr 30 mins
03 Programming project Internally assessed, externally moderated 20% 70 marks